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  • #31
    Originally posted by 50 wulf View Post
    I'd like to see a better pic of that grill and also some of the blue 109", time permitting.
    Hello again from Brisbane.

    I didn't get a particularly good angle on the two trucks in the pictures before - private property and the owners were away.

    Instead, here are a couple of photos of other trucks with the Australian grille that I mentioned being on the trayback.

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    These are both S2A's from about 1967 to 1969 - the truck in the first photo has the oval badge missing, but that can be seen in the second photo. Unlike the earlier mesh grilles the badges are not actually on the grille itself.

    The different local pattern carried through when the headlights migrated to the mudguards - as shown on our old farm 109"

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    In this case, the badge is back on the grille and part of the fixing arrangements as per the older models. This particular truck was retrofitted with a 202 ci Holden six cylinder engine but the "six' badge is referring to its' original 2.6 litre Rover engine.

    In my earlier post I mentioned thinking that the blue hardtop had been there on a previous occasion - but that was wrong.

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    The truck that I was thinking of was another altogether - and both had departed the scene. Again, likely for parts or sold as the base for future restoration projects - the old trucks are vanishing rapidly from the landscape under pressure from both local and overseas demand.

    It was actually the second truck in the photo that I was looking for because I remembered seeing the deluxe bonnet with dished wheel carrier and from a distance it didn't look too bad.

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    I had intended to call back some time when the owners were home to see if it was good enough to warrant haggling but didn't until today. Academic as it turns out.

    Cheers,

    Neil
    Last edited by S3ute; 07-28-2021, 04:03 AM.

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    • #32
      Hello again.

      Yesterday evening I wandered over to the inner city riverside yuppie haunt that my daughter these days calls home. Being a lovely evening we walked back into the city along the walking-cycle path that sits out over the river and passes through a redeveloped wharf area that now comprises a raft of trendoid eateries and bars.

      Central to the precinct is a microbrewery that runs outdoor functions on weekends. It uses these 6x6 Perenties as mobile bars.

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      Nice set ups - ideal for your next rough country camping trip. Had me thinking something along the lines of turning swords into ploughshares or similar.

      If that doesn’t light your fire - maybe this similarly converted Benz pumper might.

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      Cheers,

      Neil
      Last edited by S3ute; 07-30-2021, 04:37 AM.

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      • #33
        Was debating whether to try to convince my wife that Australia should be our next major vacation destination instead of another trip to Europe (presuming COVID ever subsides). I think Perenties-turned-mobile-beer-trucks may have just tipped the scales!
        —Mark

        1973 SIII 109 regular w/2.5NA Diesel

        When you’re dead, you do not know you are dead. It’s only painful and difficult for others. The same applies when you’re stupid.
        —Philippe Geluck

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        • #34
          SafeAirOne, if you want to practice, I'll throw a few beers in the back of my 88, just a few hours south of you. I don't have 6 wheels, though.
          ---------------------------------------------------
          '73 S3 88"
          '87 110 garden shed

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          • #35
            Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
            I don't have 6 wheels, though.
            Bring enough beer and you can ad lib it.

            Cheers

            Comment


            • #36
              I suppose a few spare wheels could make it look like a Perentie. After a few beers.
              ---------------------------------------------------
              '73 S3 88"
              '87 110 garden shed

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
                SafeAirOne, if you want to practice, I'll throw a few beers in the back of my 88, just a few hours south of you. I don't have 6 wheels, though.
                Heh heh…I’ll keep that in mind when getting my 109 back on the road makes it to the top of my “to do” list!
                —Mark

                1973 SIII 109 regular w/2.5NA Diesel

                When you’re dead, you do not know you are dead. It’s only painful and difficult for others. The same applies when you’re stupid.
                —Philippe Geluck

                Comment


                • #38
                  Hello again from Brisbane.

                  I’m a bit of a fan of Mini Mokes having owned one back in the late 70’s.

                  A couple of weeks back I was up in Darwin with the frau visiting my son and one of his work colleagues has a Moke that had undergone a fair bit of surgery.

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                  It’s a bit over the top for my liking - I prefer keeping these things a bit closer to the original design - but definitely has some get up and go. The original 998cc engine has been replaced by a fairly warm 1275cc unit taken from a Mini Cooper S Mk 2.

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                  And not just any old Cooper S. Back in the 70’s the New South Wales Police commissioned Leyland to develop and supply a hotted up Cooper S for high speed chase vehicles such was their motor racing fame at the time. This particular Moke has one of those engines in it - a real screamer.

                  Cheers,

                  Neil

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Hello again.

                    Not strictly a barn find, but fairly close.

                    Some time ago I was chatting to another member of the fly-fishing club that I joined after retiring and I happened to mention that I was restoring an old Land Rover. He mentioned that he also had one too that was sitting in a shed at his residence - a 1965 88" with the original petrol 2.25litre engine that hadn't really been driven anywhere for about 5 years. Needless to say I suggested that I was fairly keen to have a look at it, but until yesterday the opportunity to do so hadn't come by.

                    Anyway, I was part of a club working bee at this fellow's home and had expected to find something worn out and covered in dust and what not - although various brief conversations had suggested that wasn't the case which proved to be correct.

                    No rust anywhere and just a few mechanical issues that got it laid up - leaking welsh plug, and worn out clutch slave cylinder.

                    I'm trying to figure out the best way to eventually buy it from the owner - he doesn't use it any more but is clearly still a bit attached to it. Something to mull over - I still have one to get going.

                    Cheers,

                    Neil

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                    • #40
                      Welsh plug, I've heared that before , but what is it?
                      gene
                      1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                      rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

                      You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by loose gravel View Post
                        Welsh plug, I've heared that before , but what is it?
                        Hello again.

                        Welch plug, core plug, freeze plug are alternative descriptors. Always called welsh plugs around my neck of the woods. Basically the softer metal plugs that fit into the sides of the block castings.

                        Actually the owner of the truck mentioned it being under the manifold - so, rather than being one of the three drive in plugs on the left hand side of the block I’m thinking it might be one of the two smaller slotted head threaded plugs that are sited just under the manifold. There’s another fellow here who makes and sells a machined replacement that’s better than the originals.

                        Cheers,

                        Neil
                        Last edited by S3ute; 09-27-2021, 02:11 AM.

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                        • #42
                          Very original-looking truck, Neil. Is that a piece of sisal rug on the tunnel cover?

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by worldofinflation View Post
                            Very original-looking truck, Neil. Is that a piece of sisal rug on the tunnel cover?
                            Hello again.

                            Yes, that’s what it appears to be.

                            I believe the truck was used a lot for fishing and hunting trips. I thought that included a fair bit of beach fishing which is why I was half expecting it to have a lot of rust in the usual places - but it turns out that it didn’t.

                            These days the owner drives a top of the line Landcruiser 100 Series and, I’m assuming, isn’t likely to seriously get back to using the 88”. Beyond immediately attending to the two known faults there are a few tidy up opportunities such as door seals, fitting inertia seat belts and reinstall an original air cleaner but little else. Maybe add an overdrive and canvas canopy if you were inclined that way.

                            I don’t think it’s going anywhere in a hurry, but will have to open a dialogue on getting in the queue.

                            Cheers,

                            Neil
                            Last edited by S3ute; 09-27-2021, 05:44 AM.

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                            • #44
                              I like that roof rack. Simple and effective for what I do. I love the look of the full basket roof racks, but I don't need to drag that much air around most of the time. Plus, they are getting pricey.

                              I think I'll see if I can make one of those racks. Someday.
                              ---------------------------------------------------
                              '73 S3 88"
                              '87 110 garden shed

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Hello again from Brisbane.

                                I had to go over to a Land Rover parts specialist on the other side of the city yesterday to swap over a fuel tank - featured over in Current Projects - and there's sometimes a few old trucks parked about the place.

                                Yesterday's installment included an ex-Army S2A 88" and a little worse for wear S3 wagon.

                                This Series 2A is a fairly nice restoration but is probably not the original colour that it entered service wearing - for the first few years these trucks were painted a deeper bronze green in a gloss finish. Later on, and about the time that the commitment to Vietnam was increasing, the drab olive finish took over until the Perenties came in and a multi-colour savanna camo scheme superceded it. The drab olive is quite popular with restorers and enthusiasts - so, a lot of these trucks end up painted in that colour regardless of their manufacture year.


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                                This truck is also fitted with more modern tyres than it would have worn for most of its enlistment life - 7.50 X 16" bar treads were the standard military tyre. It is also missing its round bridge plate which would have been painted either yellow or drab olive - the holes for the plate are in the left hand guard. The ammo/tool box on the bumper is also a modern add-on.

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                                The S3 wagon is showing a few signs of a hard life - or lives as it looks like it's had a few owners over the years. At some stage of its life - presumably early on - it was Bahama Gold, a little of which can be seen through the present grey coat(s). The strange looking ring on the headlights appears to be what is left of mesh protectors which were once a fairly popular add-on here for reducing stone damage. The original front bumper has been replaced at some stage with a DIY alternative - judging from the holes it was likely supporting a bull bar. The factory bumpers were fairly weak and typically fold on impact with large animals.

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                                Anyway, good to see a few still about the place - nice examples fit for restoration are getting to be fairly scarce these days.

                                Cheers,

                                Neil
                                Last edited by S3ute; 09-29-2021, 04:39 AM.

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