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  • Looks great. I love that Snowy Mountain badge.

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    • Looks amazing! I really like that Rover-Landers badge!

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      • Originally posted by series guy View Post
        Looks great. I love that Snowy Mountain badge.
        Yes, it’s a nice badge - specifically made and released for sale at the 75th Anniversary event in Cooma. The choice of location wasn’t coincidental because it’s still the HQ location of the Snowy Mountains Authority (SMA) and its engineering wing the Snowy Mountains Hydroelectric Engineering Corporation.

        The Land Rover connection to both Cooma and the SMA is fairly well known - the Authority in its heyday having owned about 300 of the trucks making it the largest privately owned fleet in the world. So, it’s pretty much recognised as the “birthplace of Land Rover” locally although there were plenty of them elsewhere around the country before the SMA took them on. In fact, supposedly it was the scheme’s General Manager, Sir William Hudson, going fishing with the local farmers in their 80” trucks that led to their uptake - and the fact that government purchasing policies in the immediate post WW2 era generally favoured British imports or their locally produced equivalent. Most of the early vehicles used on the scheme were ex-Army American Jeeps, Dodges and Whites.

        Going to the badge - it is considered here to be a great thing to have an ex-Snowy Land Rover and quite a few folks claim to have that status. Whether it’s actually true is another question although there are a few things to look for that might identify one. They typically had black and white discs on the front and rear to identify whether they were survey or construction vehicles and quite a few had snowshields on the front swivel and brake assembly to keep them free from snow, mud and slush in winter. The Cooma badge itself says that this Land Rover helped build the greatest engineering project in the world so I couldn’t really put mine on my truck with a clear conscience because that wouldn’t be true - it isn’t an ex-SMA truck and probably hadn’t been within a bulls roar of the Mountains.

        Hence I’m not sure if this truck at Cooma is a genuine Snowy vehicle or a wannabe.

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        I’m not entirely convinced that it was but it’s a free world.

        On the other hand, this 109” is also claimed to be ex-SMA and may well have been.

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        It was one of the features at the Cooma gathering and you’d have to assume that the claim was correct. I note that it doesn’t have the black and white departmental disc on the left front guard panel but that might have been more of a Series 1 thing that applied when most of the early surveying and construction work was underway. Alternatively, it is also a restoration of a sixty something year old truck in which case the mudguards may well not be the originals.

        To the Snowy Scheme itself - going back to the 50’s through 70’s you only had to mention the words Snowy, the Scheme or similar and everyone knew what you were talking about. It was intended to be a post war Nation building project and it captured the public imagination like nothing since. It took 30 years to build and set a raft of tunnelling and construction records along the way. More fundamentally, however, it drew in thousands of European migrants and in the process changed this country from what was essentially a British outpost to a modern multi cultural country. That’s its real legacy - the irrigation water and electricity are an additional bonus. Ask any second, third or fourth generation person of German, Polish, Ukrainian, Scandinavian, Italian, Greek (etc) heritages how they got here and a significant proportion will say that a parent, grandparent or great grandparent came to work on the Scheme.

        Cheers,

        Neil
        Last edited by S3ute; 02-14-2024, 05:54 AM.

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        • Originally posted by 50 wulf View Post
          Looks amazing! I really like that Rover-Landers badge!
          Thanks again.

          Yes, that Roverlanders BC badge is a nice one.


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          Its release coincided with the 30th Anniversary of that club in 2014. They have a pretty good forum and you have to envy the opportunities for outdoor pursuits on offer in their neck of the woods. I went to graduate school in Vancouver in the late 1970’s and the Province simply lived up to the motto on their number plates - Beautiful British Columbia.

          I was given that particular badge a few years back by the Roverlanders President during a trip back to BC with my wife. A genuinely pleasant meeting and I stood in awe of his organisation in restoring a Series 1 from a full strip down in an apartment’s single garage.

          Cheers,

          Neil
          Last edited by S3ute; 02-12-2024, 06:11 PM.

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          • Hello again.

            That’s the twin tone horns wired up today - tomorrow is the attack on the headlamp relays.

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            Always good to be moving more forwards than backwards.

            Cheers,

            Neil​​​​​

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            • I'm in the two steps forward, one step back program. Keeps me active and humble, fixing the Rover.
              Phone or Drive, Not Both. Stop driving distracted.

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              • Originally posted by 64osby View Post
                I'm in the two steps forward, one step back program. Keeps me active and humble, fixing the Rover.
                Good to be getting ahead.

                You just have to keep those steps in the right order or you’ll become even more active, if not even more humble.

                The old saying about owning Rovers is that if you get a good one you’ll become a mechanic, get a bad one and you’ll become a philosopher.

                For my present project, regardless of the vehicle’s condition, you’ll become an electrician sooner or later.

                Cheers,

                Neil

                Comment


                • Originally posted by siiirhd88 View Post
                  The blue with red tracer wire should be power to the rear fog circuit, as the fogs are typically used only when the low beams are lit. This circuit is wired a couple of different ways, depending on MOD, relays, etc. The rear fog circuit normally has a dash warning lamp so you know its on, and on my SIII the switch and warning lamp were on the center aux panel.

                  Bob
                  Bob,

                  Got an email response from Autosparks this morning and happy to announce that you were spot on the money. They attached an updated Series 3 wiring diagram that included the front and rear fog lights which mine didn’t have. It shows a lamp switch fed by the blue/red wire with an earthed on light.

                  It all makes sense when explained, but hereabouts virtually no one has rear fog lights on their trucks - few have front fog lights either - so checking one so fitted in the flesh is fairly difficult. Mine is only getting one because the wire was in the loom and it seemed to make sense to use it. Plus there’s another redundant rear accessory wire in the harness (pink wire) so using the fog light circuit for that purpose didn’t save much anyway.

                  Cheers,

                  Neil

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by S3ute View Post

                    Bob,

                    Got an email response from Autosparks this morning and happy to announce that you were spot on the money. They attached an updated Series 3 wiring diagram that included the front and rear fog lights which mine didn’t have. It shows a lamp switch fed by the blue/red wire with an earthed on light.

                    It all makes sense when explained, but hereabouts virtually no one has rear fog lights on their trucks - few have front fog lights either - so checking one so fitted in the flesh is fairly difficult. Mine is only getting one because the wire was in the loom and it seemed to make sense to use it. Plus there’s another redundant rear accessory wire in the harness (pink wire) so using the fog light circuit for that purpose didn’t save much anyway.

                    Cheers,

                    Neil
                    Hi Neil,

                    I saw no need for the single rear fog lamp, so I think I used the circuit to supply a work lamp mounted on a bracket above the license plate lamp. Our old Discovery had rear fogs, and I found those usefull and entertaining when a vehicle was following too close. I'm really enjoying your rebuild.

                    Bob

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                    • Hello again.

                      The headlamp relay wiring got off to a mixed start this morning with some initial spurts of efficiency before hitting a bit of a snag with one of the key connections.

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                      The relays went into position near the radiator some time back so this morning’s effort was basically to begin to wire them up starting with the main power feeds from the battery positive. I’m using two relays each with a high and low circuit rather than one serving both. Probably overkill but the theory is that if one fails for some reason you still at least have one potentially functioning headlamp with high and low beam. This, of course, assumes that the failure is between the headlamp and a relay rather than further back between the switch and relays…. More practical, I suppose, is that the first relay can be reconfigured to drive both headlamps and the second relay can be used to power driving lights if decided upon at a later date.

                      All went smoothly enough until I came to the one into two Lucar sockets that split the high and low circuits between the left and right headlamps.

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                      Basically, no one sells Lucar connectors here and there were no spare male plugs on the old loom that could be salvaged and dragooned to the task. Likewise, the usual auto parts outlets don’t sell socket plug sets that involve uneven input and output connections - in this case one wire expanding to two. So, I took a three wire connector and converted it to one to two for the task and hopefully it will work OK.

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                      Basically, the single input wire will come in from the opposite side and the two output wires back out that same side and on to trigger each relay. I guess I could have just spliced the two output wires into the circuit before the double Lucar plug, or waited 3 to 6 weeks for those connectors to come from the UK but preferred to do it this way instead. Can always change it back later if it doesn’t work.

                      Cheers,

                      Neil
                      Last edited by S3ute; 02-14-2024, 05:50 AM.

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                      • Hello again.

                        A bit of (another) mea culpa note here - but I often seem to get caught up in some tunnel vision when it comes to executing some otherwise simple tasks. You start in good faith and just seem to get a fixed view on how something should be effected only to later realise that a much simpler option was readily available.

                        Case in point was wiring the relays for the headlights yesterday. I had to take two single wires from the high and low beam circuit and expand them to two wires to feed the two relays that I’m using. This exercise ended up involving two three pin blocks with one of the three pins taking a doubled up wire for the split. In all six pins used to effect the result.

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                        Well, later on while reflecting on the day’s achievements I got to thinking that if I’d gone to the trouble of soldering two wires together (twice) to make that six pin set up work to just split two wires with two block connectors then why not just use a single two pin connector for the entire task? One wire in for each of high and low beam and two split wires out going to each relay.

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                        Another Homer moment…..

                        Cheers,

                        Neil
                        Last edited by S3ute; 02-16-2024, 07:36 AM.

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                        • Hello again.

                          Been plugging away at the wiring task(s) for a little while. Unlike taking to something solid with a wrench, hammer or spanner it’s more of a fiddly task poking wires here and there, crimping and soldering connectors - dropping a few here and there - and generally trying to get the end result as neat and orderly as possible. Plus, I suppose, getting it right so that it doesn’t all go up in a shower of sparks when it’s all connected to a battery rather than test light.

                          Anyhoo - the main wiring around the radiator and battery panel is now complete.

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                          The horns and headlamp relays are all wired up taking their main power source direct from the positive battery lead and earthing back to the chassis.

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                          Power to the headlamps, turn indicators and parking lights go through a pair of three wire and a four wire blocks with the earth returns coming back through the same.

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                          This should make any future need to remove either the left or right mudguards much easier as you just pop the two blocks (and washer feed via a pair of connectors for the left guard) and everything is free from tangled wires.

                          So, now there’s just the reciprocal blocks to go on the inner faces of the mudguards themselves and the wiring should be finally completed - other than a few toggle switches and the brake test circuit on the dash auxiliary panel when the upper panel is reinstalled. That’s the next task which I’m hoping to have finished in the next few days.

                          Getting there.

                          Cheers,

                          Neil

                          Comment


                          • Hello again.

                            Another hot humid day here in the subtropics - about 32C now but likely to rise to 34C tomorrow. However, down in the Riverina of western New South Wales where my in-laws are still living it’s about 42C today but luckily for them there is relatively little humidity to kick things along.

                            Anyway, that’s the weather.

                            Been a little more progress over the last few days on the last of the wiring.

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                            The other half of the block connectors for the headlights and ancillary lights went on largely without incident. Not entirely, however, as I managed to put two of the wires in the right hand headlight three pin block in back to front. Basically, I forgot that the male and female sockets were mirror images rather than identical so brown right, blue left becomes brown left, blue right when you’re putting them together. Ordinarily no real issue but I managed to destroy two of the connector pins getting them back out and, as is too often the case, there were no spares left. Another traipse over town to restock.

                            One small issue that became a bigger issue than hoped for was the parker bulbs that came with the 7” Cibie headlight units. These are similar to BA9S bayonet bulbs but have slightly larger mounting pins than what’s on offer locally from the various auto electrics and parts outlets. I had bought a couple of replacement LED bulbs and somewhere along the way managed to lose the originals.

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                            Despite an extensive search, none of the replacement BA9S bulbs that I’ve tried stay in place in the holder even with a dab of glue. I may try solder to see if that works.

                            I had to remove the centre auxiliary panel to touch up the powdercoating where it chipped at the mounting holes. While I had it off I added a warning light for the rear fog light - in this case, using a lamp that has been hanging around the workshop here and back on the farm for about 50 years. I bought it back in the late sixties for some long forgotten job on our old Series 1 - so, it’s good to have something from the era in the cab as a working memento I suppose.

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                            Tightened up the toggle securing rings with a home made tube spanner using workshop scrap for the task. Beats trying to use circlip pliers which are a short cut to scratching the paint around the panel that the switches are set into. One little learning from this exercise was an old engineers trick of wrapping a piece of rag under the drill bit to get a perfectly circular hole. Happy to report that it works - and useful because those warning lights are a press fit and the hole diameter needs to be exact.

                            Cheers,

                            Neil
                            Last edited by S3ute; 02-23-2024, 03:42 AM.

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                            • Hello again.

                              Well, something of a milestone achieved hereabouts today.

                              The dashboard and auxiliary panel have finally been fitted. But not without numerous small challenges along the way.
                              Won’t belabour them but I have to admit that installing a Series 3 dashboard single handed is definitely not for the impatient….


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                              Anyhoo, just a few trim items to reinstall but, otherwise, the wiring is now all completed. I’ll drop it off the jacks in the next few days and get it ready to reaccept the gearbox and overdrive which were refurbished last year.

                              Coming along.

                              Cheers,

                              Neil
                              Last edited by S3ute; 03-02-2024, 04:17 AM.

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                              • Looking fantastic! Makes me dread the eventual refurb of my 110 dash though!

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