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  • Now that you know where it is inspection and testing are much easier. Ohm meters are very useful.

    The wire does look like it was direct shorted. No fuse on that circuit?
    Phone or Drive, Not Both. Stop driving distracted.

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    • Originally posted by 64osby View Post
      Now that you know where it is inspection and testing are much easier. Ohm meters are very useful.

      The wire does look like it was direct shorted. No fuse on that circuit?
      Hello and thanks.

      There was a fuse on one of the black and white wires in the sub-harness. I haven’t really teased the wires apart yet - preoccupied with some other home issues - but that wire seems to be intact. The main damage appears to be on the second black and white wire in the harness.

      I’ll get back on to a more thorough check and test in the next couple of days. I was pretty sure that I had it set up the way that it was supposed to be.

      Wouldn't be the first time that I’ve managed to include an error into my mechanical repertoire.

      Cheers,

      Neil

      Comment


      • Hello again.

        It’s been a lazy old week or two hereabouts with not a lot to show in terms of progress on the truck - a few distractions, not the least being prospectively downsizing from the present yurt to my late mother-in-law’s home around the corner. The shift from a five bedroom house with a large workshop underneath to a two bedroom bungalow with a single car garage is throwing up the odd mental challenge - not least, where to store a not quite completed Series 3 Land Rover…..

        Anyway, I did poke about the brake fail warning light/test circuit a little more and identified the burnt out wire as being the earth wire from the test switch to the small earthing bolt for the main harness that sits on top of the driver’s footwell.


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        Luckily while it had failed along most of its length it didn’t burn any of the other wires that had been taped around it throughout the sub-harness. Also, the inner core of the wire was still intact which meant that when tested for an open circuit it appeared to be fine - just the outer plastic casing had melted while most of the taped outer cover was still intact.

        That no doubt explains why the engine restorer thought the smoke was coming from somewhere near the clutch tower. This wire has a ring connector at one end and is screwed to a small common earth bolt that also has a couple of earths from the main harness attached to it. Anyway, now rectified with a new wire made up and the damaged sub-harness repaired.


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        Not entirely sure what caused the short but I had wired up the Lucas relay incorrectly - about to test whether it got fritzed as part of the failure. No doubt misadventure on my part, but for some reason that particular Lucas relay which was used in the Rover setup has its connector spades set differently to most of the other relays that I was more familiar with such as Hella or Narva. I guess I just hooked them up without really thinking about what was marked under the relay itself - the wiring diagram schematics suggested it would be like those other brands with the switch spades on the inside and relayed circuit spades on the outside positions on the base.


        Cheers,

        Neil
        Last edited by S3ute; 07-07-2024, 09:48 AM.

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        • Happy day!

          Just bench tested the Lucas relay and it appears to work fine.


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          A bit of a relief because tracking down that particular relay hereabouts isn’t so easy nowadays and I wasn’t keen on reordering another from the UK. I suppose in reality any old relay would do the job but I’m a bit of a stickler for using the original stuff where possible.

          On another note I replaced the dodgy headlamp switch - third time lucky I suppose. A couple of Lucas replacements from the UK had previously failed on testing and the original went up in a puff of smoke when I used it to bench test another electrical item.

          Cheers,

          Neil
          Last edited by S3ute; 07-07-2024, 01:20 PM.

          Comment


          • Hello again.

            Back in the workshop getting the sense of another exercise in grief in the making - this time choke cables and their warning lights.

            I replaced the original Zenith carburettor with a Weber unit and this came with its own choke cable which I opted to use since the original was looking a bit worn and ratty.

            Well and good, but the Weber choke apart from having a fairly cheap looking pull knob had the metal collar that gets the warning light switch attached to it set up at the knob end rather than mid length like the original Rover unit.

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            The downside of that is that the switch ends up jammed up in the instrument binnacle which is already contested space before the various wiring add-ons are also crammed in there. It’s also much easier to access the switch from inside the engine bay in the case of the original.

            Well and good, but some time back when I was testing the old warning switch I managed to short it out so had to order a new one. These are scarce and don’t come cheap - but worse than that the original Land Rover part that came from the UK (Series 3, Defender) doesn’t have the screw on metal bracket to hold the switch firmly to the metal collar on the choke cable. Rather it simply clips on with nothing to hold it in place other than two fairly weak plastic legs.

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            These don’t really work and I had to resort to cable ties but it’s not really satisfactory. So, I may have to go looking for a working original on a wreck. Not a good return on the $90 or so that I paid getting it from the UK.

            It does work - as bench testing suggested - but I’m not confident that the cable ties will provide a reliable outcome over the longer term.


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            Going back to the new choke cable - the local parts outlets only sell Britpart and I wasn’t going there. I found a “genuine” part for a Series 3 RHD in the UK and went with that. However, when I opened the package the first impression was that it was fairly short.


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            I’m about to try installing it this morning but won’t be surprised if it doesn’t reach the carburettor - alternatively, pleasantly surprised if it does. Despite it being marked as RHD I’m suspicious that it might be for a LHD vehicle.

            Will soon know…..

            Cheers,

            Neil


            Comment


            • Hello again.

              I might have been playing a bit of Chicken Little too early in the previous post. While the new choke cable is about 10” shorter than the one that came with the Weber, I dug out the original cable from the parts pile and they are the same length. So, that’s encouraging.


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              One other reason for ditching the Weber cable was that it didn’t lock on pull out but rather acted more like a spring loaded hand throttle. The original and the recent replacement do stay out when pulled which is what you’d expect.

              Cheers,

              Neil

              Comment


              • Hello again.

                Well, it’s another WTF moment hereabouts.

                I have just had a go at installing the new choke cable into the truck and it appears to be the case that it’s about 6-10” too short to reach the attachment points on the carburettor.


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                I’m having to guess that there is some fundamental difference between the Zenith and Weber choke arrangement even though they both mount in the same place on the inlet manifold.

                Unfortunately, I recently gave the old carburettor to another Rover owner in Victoria and haven’t got anything to make a quick comparison. So, unless something magical happens to change the routing or have it grow a bit I may have to revert to the Weber cable and also write off another $90 to misadventure.

                Not a happy thought.

                Cheers,

                Neil
                Last edited by S3ute; 07-08-2024, 11:25 AM.

                Comment


                • pretty sure i have the choke cable in my parts and it’s off of a RHD late S3 88. Was hooked to a zenith 36iv. its removed and not going back on due to EFi. be a few weeks before back to check.
                  Erik

                  1970ish exMOD 109

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Xplitive View Post
                    pretty sure i have the choke cable in my parts and it’s off of a RHD late S3 88. Was hooked to a zenith 36iv. its removed and not going back on due to EFi. be a few weeks before back to check.
                    Hello and thanks.

                    I’m now fairly sure that the most recent purchase did come as a RHD model choke cable for a Series 3. It’s exactly the same as the original one in both build and length and that came off my truck which is a RHD Series 3 88” that was originally fitted with a Zenith carburettor on its 2.25 litre petrol engine.

                    The apparent explanation for being too short would seem to be that the Weber and Zenith carburettors have different choke cable arrangements and these involve the cables being about 10” difference in length. Even really pulling the cable as tight as possible won’t quite get there and the resultant angles would render it fairly inoperable.

                    I’m toying with ideas on how to use the new cable because of the reasons given before - mainly where the warning switch mounting collar is positioned and that it stays out when engaged. One thought is to site the knob on the firewall similar to the Series 1’s which would probably work without involving too far a reach to engage it.

                    Something to work on.

                    Cheers,

                    Neil
                    Last edited by S3ute; Yesterday, 03:35 AM.

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                    • Okay - there's my answer.


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                      The Zenith carburettor has its choke connections on the side rather than front - I kind of suspected that might be the case looking at the new cable.

                      Another challenge to address I guess.

                      Cheers,

                      Neil

                      Comment


                      • Hello again.

                        Still a slow week with a few small catch up jobs on the electrics.

                        Sticking to the brake fail/test circuit I opted to bench test the repaired loom and 6RA relay before reinstalling it into the truck. That seemed to avoid a lot of potential future trouble if for some reason setting it up the way I believed it should be done was wrong and the earth decided to crap itself again.


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                        All the appearances of another Heath Robinson device but it did work and there was no spark or smoke anywhere to be seen. Essentially driven by the loom, three switches, the relay and an indicator lamp - seemingly mimicking Rover’s overkill efforts to check that a single light bulb is working. Basically, the check system only works if the dual brake valve fails and creates an earth. Otherwise, turning the ignition or pressing the test switch does no more than light a bulb in the test switch.

                        Global Roamer had kindly sent me a replacement solenoid for the Startrex starter that I bought locally some years ago but hadn’t installed. It had been sitting unattended on the workbench for a few weeks so I put it back on to the motor and will test it later when I’m working on testing the rest of the circuitry.


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                        I’m hoping now to be on the road by the time the next All British Day is held here again in September. So, there’s a bit of pressure on to speed up progress before then.

                        Cheers,

                        Neil
                        Last edited by S3ute; Yesterday, 07:59 AM.

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                        • Another fiddle job worked on this afternoon.

                          I mentioned that the Rover choke cable wasn’t really compatible with the replacement Weber carburettor that I had previously fitted to my engine. Also, that the choke cable that came with it was long enough but suffered a couple of disadvantages.

                          One was that the collar for the choke on warning light switch was fixed at the knob end and only just fits inside the instrument binnacle. The other that it doesn’t lock on when activated so you have to keep pulling it until the choke isn’t needed. The second is probably more an artefact of the carburettor and not a lot can be done about it. I figured that without resiting the Rover cable the Weber cable would have to do - so, I bench tested the warning light switch on that cable again and found that it didn’t actually work.


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                          The problem was that there was a small groove created when the knob shaft was crimped to the inner flexible cable and this sat just below the hole in the outer case where the small activator pin on the switch is located. So, the pin isn’t depressed when the choke is released and the light circuit isn’t broken.


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                          To rectify this I rotated the cable case 45 degrees and drilled a 1/8” hole adjacent to the original.


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                          Works fine - the issue of holding the switch in place with cable ties remains, but otherwise it at least is the best option to hand.

                          Cheers,

                          Neil
                          Last edited by S3ute; Yesterday, 03:41 AM.

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