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1965 88" IIa

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  • 1965 88" IIa

    I've been on the forum for a few years and bought a '65 IIa at the end of last summer. There's a tread about that here: http://www.gunsandrovers.com/forum/g...ought-a-series

    I guess it's time to really introduce myself, start documenting the project, and ask questions in one continuous thread. So, I'm Luc. I live in NY where I split my time between Brooklyn and the North Fork of Long Island.

    The truck came from a great seller, a member here, who had it on a ranch in Texas for several years and bought it from another Texan. I ordered a heritage certificate and was not surprised that it was originally sold in Texas. It is very nearly rust free, though some previous rust repair to the rear crossmember and left frame horn have been done, as well as part of the drivers side footwell. This was all done before the person I bought it from owned it. The certificate also confirmed that now repainted a sand color it was originally light green, which is still visible under most of the panels. Unfortunately the paint, though good in most spots, is flaking off in a number of places. Worse that that, nearly all the galvanized bits were also repainted silver.

    I drove the car locally and though it runs, starts, steers and handles well the brakes, clutch, wiring, weather stripping (door, top, windscreen seals) and cooling all need attention. Additionally the interior was a combo of peeling carpeting and asphalt sound dampening foil-goo that leaked and stuck to everything when the temperatures went up. Against good sense I decided to stop driving the truck and address all the issues I've found.

    I plan to rejuvenate the truck, fixing all the mechanical issues and making small modifications for better driving, stopping, reliability and rust proofing and aesthetically restoring it to what it was originally, though I may go with mid grey rather than light green.

    I've stripped the galvanized capping, windscreen and random bits using citrus strip. It took forever and was probably a waste of time as acid dipping or sandblasting would have been fast. I’ve removed most of the body except for the bulkhead in preparation to galvanize and paint. This is where I was a few days ago before pressure washing the chassis.

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  • #2
    Nice. Looks like a normal Rover oil change with a bout of ship fitters thrown in. Looks as though you are starting with a pretty solid truck. That makes you smarter than many of us here : ).

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    • #3
      Looking good.
      Erik

      1970ish exMOD 109

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      • #4
        Before I weld a new front onto the frame horns I'm thinking of drilling a hole through the front and the area blocked by where the bumper bolts go. What are others doing in this area to avoid a moisture trap?

        Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_2062.jpg Views:	0 Size:	75.5 KB ID:	191735

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        • #5
          For a captured area like that, if you do put a drill hole in there you could shoot Fluid Film in. It's a lanolin based rust preventer that you can shoot in once a year.
          ---------------------------------------------------
          '73 S3 88"
          '87 110 garden shed

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          • #6
            Boy, time moves fast. I'm not much farther along with this than I was 4 months ago. Truck is disassembled (that's the hard part, right?). One of the main motivating factors of doing this was correcting the paint and painted galvanized bits. I stripped the silver paint from all the galvanized cappings and stored the tub outside for several weeks. During that time the newly stripped parts corroded with surface rust so now I will re-galvanize them.

            Best way to remove rivets to free the cappings? I read about using an old chisel. Will that break through both the pop and hammer rivets? drilling out seems tedious but maybe safer for the panels.

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            • #7
              Drill them out with a 3/16 bit anything that doesn't pop out by drilling can be punched out easily with a pin punch
              Steve

              1964 Series IIa In progress
              1968 S IIa (Sold)
              1972 S III (Sold)
              1996 Discovery SE-7 (Sold)
              1985 J**p CJ-7 (For Sale)

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              • #8
                I used an air chisel on the back side of the solid rivets. Made quick work removing the bad panels on the seat box.
                Put your phone down and drive. Stop driving distracted.

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                • #9
                  Snap-On and Matco both sell a stiff blade putty knife that will take a razor sharp edge on a stone and hold it. I have chiseled off hundreds of Land Rover rivets with it without hurting capping or body parts. It’s super quick and easy. I have a friend that works at a knife shop. He put some fancy scales on one of these for me. I don’t think it will get hammered on anymore. For that I have a couple of others.

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                  • #10
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	27BBEE2A-8D2A-4017-99C8-5F042BE5235D.jpeg
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ID:	195291I ended up using a cheap-ish 1/2" wood chisel from a home depot set I bought a decade ago. I removed all the cappings on the tub but still need to do the seat box and possibly the tub supports. My chisel is pretty well trashed now. I'll look into some of these other options for this next round.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      The solid round head rivets are the most difficult to remove cleanly. I found a sharp chisel worked best. In some places you can take the inside part off and pop the head out with a center punch. In other places you need to take the round head off and punch the rest inside.. Pop rivets I drilled (1/4"bit) out until the head came off and centerpunched the remains out.
                      gene
                      1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                      rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

                      You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

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                      • #12
                        When it comes to seatbox and tub bolts a quick hit with a new 3/16 drill bit makes the heads snap right off and saves a ton of time during disassembly.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by series guy View Post
                          When it comes to seatbox and tub bolts a quick hit with a new 3/16 drill bit makes the heads snap right off and saves a ton of time during disassembly.
                          Not quite sure I understand. Did you mean to say bolts?
                          For quick diasassembly and reassembly of the seatbox bolts, I use a 7/16" nut driver with the handle removed in my cordless drill. I actually use it everywhere I can in all the sizes.
                          gene
                          1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                          rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

                          You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

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                          • #14
                            I was referring to disassembly of a project truck with rusty bolts and nuts that aren’t worth saving. If you drill into the head a little past the depth of the head they twist right off with no damage to the surrounding metal vs a fight to the death with the obligatory sacrifice of knuckle skin.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by series guy View Post
                              I was referring to disassembly of a project truck with rusty bolts and nuts that aren’t worth saving. If you drill into the head a little past the depth of the head they twist right off with no damage to the surrounding metal vs a fight to the death with the obligatory sacrifice of knuckle skin.
                              Ok, thanks for that, good to know. I usually twist em till they break.
                              gene
                              1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                              rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

                              You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

                              Comment

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