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Finally, a working brake light switch

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  • #16
    Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
    Neil,

    Anyone who knows these old cars would (or should) just wink at me when they discover all of the "modern" updates. Gotta keep them running.

    Speaking of shows, I took the Rover to a car show near me. They took tons of pictures of everyones cars. They posted lots of pics of them online and not one was my truck. My paint job (it's a mess) apparently embarrasses some folks. While I'm ranting, I was the only one of 200 cars to let kids climb all over the inside and have the parents take pics of them in my truck.
    Rant complete, for now.
    Hello again.

    Yes, it doesn’t pay to get too precious about the old trucks - and short of having some kid or his dog take a whizz on the seats or swallow the ignition key there isn’t a lot of damage that car show crowds can do to them.

    Anyway, I’m sure as far as your truck goes you awarded it first prize.

    Cheers,

    Neil

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    • #17
      Photo of my switch set up. I don’t know the part number of the spring unfortunately. I just tested a few of them until it felt right. Click image for larger version

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      • #18
        That spring looks like a slightly lighter version of what I have. Time to get to the hardware store and start digging around.

        Neil, I was not expecting a prize, since so little has been done cosmetically. I LOVE when kids crawl in and on the truck. My own kids, 8 and 10 years old, have driven the Rover in the back yard in low range since it was safe enough to do so two years ago. I'm attempting to get them interested enough so that they will learn to keep an old car (maybe the Rover) on the road.

        My boys showed me that you CAN break stuff inside a S3 (I'm looking at you, turn signal stalk!). They discovered the horn on the stalk and that was all they did for a few years.
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        '73 S3 88"
        '87 110 garden shed

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
          My boys showed me that you CAN break stuff inside a S3 (I'm looking at you, turn signal stalk!). They discovered the horn on the stalk and that was all they did for a few years.
          Ah! Not the dreaded S3 indicator stalk!

          About the only thing flimsier that those things is the Britpart replacement…….

          What were the engineers thinking?

          Cheers,

          Neil

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          • #20
            Engineers were no where near that decision. That was an accounting measure, I'd bet. Or some not to "modernization" or something.
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            '73 S3 88"
            '87 110 garden shed

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            • #21
              When my hydraulic switch broke on my 109 I went to Home Depot and bought a refrigerator light switch and created the bracket just like the one in the picture at the top of this thread and installed it. I stuffed the wires back through the firewall and just plugged it right in and I've had working brake lights ever since.
              Visit my store to get your Rover T-Shirts!
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              • #22
                Hello again from Brisbane.

                Given how effective some easy modification is to overcoming long-standing design irks on the trucks - the brake light switch in question being a prime example and another being the non relay protected S3 indicator stalk - you have to ask yourself why it was done that way. I suspect the closest answer to the facts is that they had that technology lying about and they simply could. Why they didn’t ditch them is probably dogged determination to stand fast against the odds.

                Moving to a wider arena, the Victorian age was replete with examples of folks doing things not so much because it made much sense but because the opportunity was there and you could. One example that has long amused me is Macquarie Island lying about 1500 kilometres from Tasmania and half way to Antarctica. This plot of storm swept land of about 37km x 5 km at its widest was initially exploited for its abundant seal and penguin populations - but attempts were also made to establish sheep farms on it - presumably to ship wool all the way back to the UK. It failed but when I asked a historian about it the short response was probably that it was there and you theoretically could - enough for the Victorians to have a go.

                We’re a funny old crew. Maybe Land Rover engineers and accountants carried more of those Victorian genes than thought.

                Cheers,

                Neil

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                • #23
                  It's possible, too, that LR thought they were upgrading us to the space age with the exotic multi function stalk and plastic dash.

                  Speaking of sheep that far south - when they sheared them in the spring (?) I wonder if they just froze to death without their coats.
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                  '73 S3 88"
                  '87 110 garden shed

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
                    Speaking of sheep that far south - when they sheared them in the spring (?) I wonder if they just froze to death without their coats.
                    Hello again.

                    Not sure about newly shorn sheep, but humans face some pretty bleak prospects there without the fancy living pods that have been installed in more recent times. The Australian Antarctic Division regularly holds survival training courses on the Island to harden up crews going the full distance.

                    It‘s on my bucket list but I’m fairly confident that I’ll not step foot on it in my remaining lifetime.

                    Cheers,

                    Neil

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                    • #25
                      Neil,

                      I just read an amazing book by Michael Palin (of Monty Python fame) about explorers trying to discover the North West Passage, between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans by way of Norther Canada. Some of the crews also went to Antarctica, and stopped at the island you mention, in the 1800's. A fine read, and it makes me feel like I've never done anything worthwhile in my whole life. I strongly recommend it, for whenever you don't need to be working on your Rover, or casting a line in a perfect stream.

                      "Erebus: One Ship, Two Epic Voyages, and the Greatest Naval Mystery of All Time" author Michael Palin.




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                      '73 S3 88"
                      '87 110 garden shed

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
                        "Erebus: One Ship, Two Epic Voyages, and the Greatest Naval Mystery of All Time" author Michael Palin.
                        Hello from Brisbane.

                        Your recommendation on that Palin book is heartily endorsed - I do have a copy on my bookshelf and did thoroughly enjoy reading it. For a non historian Palin wrote it very well.

                        The commander of the ill fated expedition Sir John Franklin was a reasonably popular Governor of Tasmania and there is a statue of him in Franklin Square in Hobart. Plus a wilderness river, town, mountain and so on. He is probably more famous here than anywhere else.

                        I remember reading a Canadian Geographic many years ago that, among other aspects of the lost expedition, covered the discovery of the mummified crewmen and conjecture on how many of the crew might have died from overexposure to lead from the food cans etc. There’s also an excellent section covering the lost expedition in the National Maritime Museum in Halifax, Nova Scotia. So, when the book came out I was quick to line up for a copy.

                        As a bit of a side track - the highest mountain in Antarctica is Mt Erebus which is also an active volcano. Back in the 70’s an Air New Zealand DC10 crashed into it during a scenic flight with all on board lost.

                        Two tragedies with the same connection I suppose.

                        Cheers,

                        Neil
                        Last edited by S3ute; 09-22-2021, 03:03 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Hello again from Brisbane.

                          I recognise that this is getting well off the topic of brake light switches but thought if you are looking for a good read on arduous journeys you should track down a book on the voyage of the lifeboat James Caird

                          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voya...he_James_Caird

                          Having grown through the radical 60’s I’m about as cynical of institutions and popular “heroes” as anyone else - but one man whose name I come close to revering (other than my late Dad) is Sir Ernest Shackleton - despite having a few character flaws, leadership, bravery and competence under duress weren’t among them.

                          Surviving the incident involving the near capsize was simply remarkable.

                          Cheers,

                          Neil

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                          • #28
                            Neil, the Shackleton book was all the rage some 30 years ago here. I think I read it, but I'll have to see if I have it and read a few chapters to check. I did see a replica (pretty sure not the original) of the lifeboat in question at Boston's Museum of Science. Small boat, big ocean. Kind of like the isolation that many on this forum seek out with our Rovers in remote places, but most of us don't experience the threat of dying at any moment.
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                            '73 S3 88"
                            '87 110 garden shed

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RustCollector View Post
                              Neil, the Shackleton book was all the rage some 30 years ago here. I think I read it, but I'll have to see if I have it and read a few chapters to check. I did see a replica (pretty sure not the original) of the lifeboat in question at Boston's Museum of Science. Small boat, big ocean. Kind of like the isolation that many on this forum seek out with our Rovers in remote places, but most of us don't experience the threat of dying at any moment.
                              Hello again.

                              That’s probably about when I read Shackleton’s book the first time too. As a kid we generally heard more about Scott and Amundsen in our history lessons.

                              I believe the original James Caird is held in the library of Shackleton’s old school Dulwich College in London.

                              Lyttelton in New Zealand and Hobart in Tasmania both had direct engagement with the various British Antarctic expeditions - and pretty good exhibits in their respective maritime museums. The last time that I was in Hobart there was an interesting exhibit on Amundsen and his various exploits - unusually a bit more sympathetic than some of coverage that he got in the past.

                              Going back to the James Caird epic - I still recall the description of the near capsize incident. He described sitting on watch freezing cold and wet and noticed a lightening of the sky on the horizon and thought it must have been approaching dawn. But it was too early and that’s when he realised it was the wave and called them to action - must have been hell.

                              Cheers,

                              Neil
                              Last edited by S3ute; 09-23-2021, 01:52 AM.

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                              • #30
                                Having done a good bit of offshore sailing, I can relate to seeing things in the near darkness. I haven't seen a giant wave approaching, thankfully. I can only imagine...
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                                '73 S3 88"
                                '87 110 garden shed

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