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Brit Dog's Tow Truck "Reborn" as Alice

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  • Brit Dog's Tow Truck "Reborn" as Alice

    I bought Alice from a car dealer in West Monroe, LA. My son was at Ole Miss at the time, so he went over to check it out and brought it home in November of 2014. It had been for sale on ebay in 2011. This is a picture of it on the lot.

  • #2
    It set out side in my drive until I finally got a shop built in 2015. I started the rebuild in late April of 2016.
    I knew I was going to have to get a bulkhead & chassis. I finally decided on Marshall's for the bulkhead and Pickles for the chassis.
    Fortunately Evan Marshall was kind enough to take the bulkhead over to Pickles so they could be shipped together. I was also able to find a tailboard from James Diehl and he also took it to Pickles. I didn't receive the shipment until January of 2020. I finally got the axles put together and the chassis rolling in April of 2020. 4 years from the start date. Seems like a long time but there is alot of waiting on parts.

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    • #3
      Nice!

      Tangential to the topic, but was Brit Bulldog the guy operating out of an old mill in Fall River, MA? If so, I had stopped there in '96 or so looking for my first Series. We talked for 5 mins or so and he tossed me the keys to a RHD 88" PU. I remember he had some interesting projects, a few trucks for sale and a stack of galvanized chassis just off the boat from the UK. I went back a while later to talk business and he was gone....

      Seemed like an OK chap.
      Last edited by pitchrollyaw; 09-21-2021, 02:51 AM.
      sigpic
      '72 Series III 88"
      '85 d90 2.5NA
      '74 TR6

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      • #4
        All the waiting on parts leaves plenty of time for cleaning parts.No telling how many cases of brake cleaner & steel wool and scotch brite pads I have used.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pitchrollyaw View Post
          Nice!

          Tangential to the topic, but was Brit Bulldog the guy operating out an old mill in Fall River, MA? If so, I had stopped there in '96 or so looking for my first Series. We talked for 5 mins or so and he tossed me the keys to a RHD 88" PU. I remember he had some interesting projects, a few trucks for sale and a stack of galvanized chassis just off the boat from the UK. I went back a while later to talk business and he was gone....

          Seemed like an OK chap.
          Yep That was his place. His name was Seth. Very nice guy to deal with at the time.

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          • #6
            Great project, glad it's getting some attention

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            • #7
              In December o0f 2018 I started on the engine rebuild. That's when I found the block was cracked. About 13 inches of crack.
              Needless to say I was disappointed.

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              • #8
                Since this is the original block, I wanted to keep it. I did some inquiry into welding cast iron. That didn't seem to be a good option, then someone told me to check into "stitching".
                I found a place in California called Lock N Stitch. After several calls and picture sending. I decided that was the place to use.
                Man, they are awesome.

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                • #9
                  I meant to start this under "Current Projects" Can a moderator move this thread?

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                  • #10
                    Hello from Brisbane.

                    Since the thread involves 107” trucks fitted out as recovery units, I thought you might be interested in this truck that was on display at a vintage tractor and truck show near here last year.

                    Your photos reminded me of it a bit. It was originally used by the local automobile club - RACQ - as a service and recovery vehicle somewhere on the Darling Downs. The guy who had recently acquired it was hoping to find someone who knew it’s history or where to source parts for it.

                    Cheers,

                    Neil


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                    Last edited by S3ute; 09-21-2021, 04:44 AM.

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                    • #11
                      indeed. i have had a soft spot for these trucks since a very young age

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by minirover View Post
                        All the waiting on parts leaves plenty of time for cleaning parts.No telling how many cases of brake cleaner & steel wool and scotch brite pads I have used.
                        Yeah, I figure I spent some 6-8 months waiting on parts for my 5 year rebuild.
                        gene
                        1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                        rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/



                        "We are prisoners of the Present, forever transitioning between our inaccessible Past and our unknowable Future." Neil DeGrasse-Tyson

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by minirover View Post
                          Since this is the original block, I wanted to keep it. I did some inquiry into welding cast iron. That didn't seem to be a good option, then someone told me to check into "stitching".
                          I found a place in California called Lock N Stitch. After several calls and picture sending. I decided that was the place to use.
                          Man, they are awesome.
                          Damn...that's good work. Hard to believe it's the same block. Welding cast iron is a dying, almost vanished skill. Definitely requires a lot of 'experience' and a kiln capable of pre-heating the work piece. In this seaport town with a great number of metal-working ventures, I could find *one guy* who could weld up a plate from my 40 year old Vermont Castings wood stove.
                          “… of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people; commencing demagogues, and ending tyrants.” — Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist Papers, #1

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                          • #14
                            Unfortunately a lot of old skills are going away. Fortunately this cast stitching procedure is a great option.

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                            • #15
                              hmmm...all I did was type 'cast iron stitching' into youtube and poof! suddenly my morning disappeared. I've learned something today. so... Thanks!

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