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  • #46
    I went over my limit for pictures, so here's the bolt flange's polished seal surface. There are scratches, but you can't feel them. I think the seal rides a bit to the left and misses them anyway.

    Click image for larger version

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    '73 S3 88"
    '87 110 garden shed

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    • #47
      Everyone has their methods so here is mine. Making sure everything is clean is always the first step. Next I polish the seal surface, in this case the crank, with scotchbrite. I use Yamabond 4 (same as Threebond) on the gasket surfaces and the old Permatex Number 2 on any bolt threads that may go into oil or water passages. If you are concerned about nicking the seal on the crank during installation you can make a seal protector from a 24oz. Pepsi plastic bottle. Install the housing and torque to spec. If you sacrificed some blood during this procedure your chance for success will be greatly improved.
      Last edited by series guy; 06-17-2022, 05:54 PM.

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      • #48
        Thanks, Mark.

        There's enough blood on the Rover and in the shop to qualify as a murder scene.

        What grade of Scotchbrite do you use? Do you polish dry or with oil?

        I will buy some Permatex #2 for the threads.

        The rear main seal comes packaged with an installation tool, much like the plastic soda bottle you mentioned. It made installation easy enough, and I think it's impossible without it. Clearly, I made some mistakes, though.

        Second time's the charm? Hope so.

        Cheers.
        ---------------------------------------------------
        '73 S3 88"
        '87 110 garden shed

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        • #49
          Second time's the charm? Hope so.
          It took me two tries before I got a decent seal. The first one I rushed and was pretty ham handed. A couple hemostats helped with getting that fiddly little spring in place.

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          • #50
            Paul, now that I know it can be messed up so easily, I'm going to treat this one better.

            Anyone have a nice solution to accessing the bell housing nuts, other than removing the entire floor? Did I once see a trick removable panel that allows access to those nuts? I can't recall.
            Last edited by RustCollector; 06-18-2022, 02:56 AM.
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            '73 S3 88"
            '87 110 garden shed

            Comment


            • #51
              I usually use the maroon scotchbrite dry to polish up a seal surface. One of the best things to buy for a Series truck is all new floor/tunnel/seatbox hardware. It makes removal of said parts a 20 minute job instead of an all day battle.

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              • #52
                Yes, I have new-ish hardware for the floors. Huge difference, as you say. I wish there was a good way to seal the floors and still be able to remove them. I'm using body seam sealer, which is messy to apply and holds on pretty well, making it hard to remove. I guess I should hope that I won't have to remove the floors for at least a few years now. I could try closed cell foam, I guess, but the floor panels have inconsistent gaps all around.

                I installed the new seal, the flywheel, and the clutch. I was working against the clock and with my hands either full or covered in goop, so no pictures. Just imagine all of the photos above but without the oil. The new rear main seal was a bear to install, even with the supplied installation cone. I did use a piece of soda bottle along with the cone tool.

                I am now wondering if the leak was really in the flywheel bolts, and not from the RMS. Hard to say and impossible to prove either way.

                I might have time this weekend to put the engine back.
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                '73 S3 88"
                '87 110 garden shed

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                • #53
                  I use plumbers putty to seal the tunnel and floors. It’s cheap, not sticky, and cleans off very easily. Also works extremely well on varying gaps.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by series guy View Post
                    I use plumbers putty to seal the tunnel and floors. It’s cheap, not sticky, and cleans off very easily. Also works extremely well on varying gaps.
                    I use this window caulking cord mainly because it's what I have on the shelf. It's much like plumbers putty.

                    Click image for larger version

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                    • #55
                      I've used both of those before, but never on a car. Great ideas, thanks.
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                      '73 S3 88"
                      '87 110 garden shed

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Progress - my dear wife gave me several hours of unsupervised time today, due to it being Father's Day. I'm sure I'll pay for it later...

                        The engine/tranny are fully torqued together and fastened in place, and the engine is all set except for the coolant system. I needed a new speedo cable, so the t-case end of that is in place. I'll do the dash end when I do a few other dash related things. Forgot to mention that I did polish the crank journal with gray ScotchBrite.

                        While taking the rad support off for the second time in a week, I finally couldn't ignore the rust bubbles under new paint on the lower section. I welded in a new lower section a few years ago, and I knew I had to deal with the zinc coating in the new steel. I made and used a "mordant solution", which is the British name for what I think is called T-wash in the states (corrections welcome). Anyway, mordant solution turns the zinc black, and that's supposed to mean you can paint over it (my understanding at the time). Nice idea, but it didn't work for long. I sprayed epoxy primer and then a 2k paint, and that looked great for a year, maybe. Today I chipped, scraped and sanded all of the primer and paint off of the new steel, and it was all covered with surface rust. I learned after I sprayed this that zinc doesn't like having solvent based paints stick to it. I can vouch for that. So, the paint trapped water behind it and allowed the rusting.

                        Since I was under time constraints (like always), I didn't think to take a pic until after I had finished sanding. I sanded it enough so that I'm pretty sure there's no zinc left on the steel. I hit it with a rust converter, which should keep it from flash rusting until I can get some epoxy primer on there. You can see the pitting where the converter turned the rust dark.

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                        I don't normally have Shipfitter's Disease, but I really don't like reinstalling rusty stuff if I can help it. At least not stuff that rust can put holes in before I get around to painting properly. My detour will only cost me a half a day's work and maybe a week's elapsed time.

                        I also did a quickie paint job on the steel tunnel piece that goes between the bulkhead and the tunnel cover with all the gear lever holes. Years ago I did a booger weld repair of it, and it was rusting in places.

                        So, I've done all the work I can until I can reinstall the radiator support. I'm going to get some Mor-Tite and plumber's putty tomorrow and install the floors. Wait, I think I'll skip the weather sealing until I know I don't have to take the motor out again. I think that qualifies as learning, right there.
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                        '73 S3 88"
                        '87 110 garden shed

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                        • #57
                          I still don't have all the floor screws in my truck from when I finished it in 2018. After today I just might install them. I played around with some idle adjustments to the fuel injection Saturday and driving it to and from the car show today it was just running like it had 20 extra horsepower.

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                          • #58
                            20 extra horses! You might get yourself arrested with that kind of power.
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                            '73 S3 88"
                            '87 110 garden shed

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                            • #59
                              I don't seal my floor panels, they come up too often. Besides I need the water to leak out.
                              gene
                              1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                              rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

                              You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

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                              • #60
                                So I hit the garage today with the intention of installing the rest of my floor screws and calling it done. After a thorough cleaning with an air hose and blow gun I decided that the corrosion on the edges of the floor panels looked bad so I made a new drivers side panel and etch primed it and painted the bottom. I have some sound damping material I’ll stick on it before I install it. Probably make a new passenger side panel tomorrow so that it looks crisp also. Done for the day, it’s off to the gun club for some lead therapy.

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