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  • T-Seals Fail!

    CORK T-SEALS SUCK! I am willing to admit it could be the end user.. Disappointed, guess I'm waiting for another week to complete the Bottom End. WTF
    This time I'm going to get rubber! Do the Cork seals below look correct, I feel they should be longer on the T end. Has anyone ever just used Right Stuff in place of the seals? Thx

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20230923_171158.jpg Views:	0 Size:	186.4 KB ID:	216264 Click image for larger version  Name:	20230923_093147.jpg Views:	0 Size:	192.3 KB ID:	216265 Click image for larger version  Name:	20230923_171150.jpg Views:	0 Size:	158.1 KB ID:	216266
    1963 Series II A 88

  • #2
    not sure what was used, I have heard of a sealant/gasket maker used instead of the preformed seal. or the results,
    gene
    1960 109 w/ 200TDI
    rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/

    You don't see faith healers working in hospitals for the same reason you don't see psychics winning the lottery.

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    • #3
      I just put the LR recommended grease lightly and the seals in the photo, and attempted to install with feeler gauge and thin plastic.. and it was not happening. I've done this before with the P38 and really never had any issue. But as G. Cocker says "this is where SHIT gets real" I'll just order the rubber seals and end my suffering no big..
      1963 Series II A 88

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      • #4
        I use the rubber T seals from Turner Engineering, smear them with Permatex Ultra Black, and install with seal guides. So far I’ve had very good luck but they will harden over time and start leaking.

        I have heard of people using just Permatex but haven’t been brave enough to try it myself.

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        • #5
          I used reg permatex with my T-seals.

          The Green Bible specifies you need to not cut the end of the long part of the T-seal flush with the block. Leaving some of the seal proud allows the oil pan to crush the seal into the slot, expanding the cork and helping it seal.

          That said, I used Right Stuff to seal the pan to the block….
          1968 Series 2a, 88
          1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

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          • #6
            No issues with the cork type here

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            • #7
              If you ever have to drop the pan you will be a very unhappy camper. It will need chiseled off.

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              • #8
                Rubber Seals w/ Hylomar Blue…Good To Go !

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by series guy View Post
                  If you ever have to drop the pan you will be a very unhappy camper. It will need chiseled off.
                  Guessing you are replying to my post - I already had to once! It was work, I won't sugar coat it. BUT it was not unreasonable/impossible. I used wire to break the seal and a few wood shims to get the pan to separate from the block. Getting the Right Stuff cleaned off required a little elbow grease but it wasn't hours. I resealed it again with Right stuff and my oil sump (still) does not leak - to me it's a worthy tradeoff. I don't drop the sump that often - once in 8 years and counting... for an RMS job. I won't need to drop it again any time soon.
                  1968 Series 2a, 88
                  1997 Defender SW (Original Owner - Sold)

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                  • #10
                    Yes. Luckily the Rover oil pan is pretty stout and can take some force without being destroyed. I had some experience with an automatic transmission oil pan that didn’t go so well. I’m a bid fan of Threebond/Yamabond along with a gasket. Comes apart easily and cleans up with lacquer thinner.

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                    • #11
                      I tried this approach but it failed for me. I think it's user error, not the approach Mike (Britanica Restorations) uses.
                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uRcB06IJXf4&t=1230s

                      Though after I tried my RMS, Mark (Series Guy) mentioned Yamabond, which I've since used in various applications and have been very happy. Methinks I'll be using rubber seals and a little yamabond in the coming days to try to reseal the RMS. It's getting bad.
                      1969 Marine Blue Bugeye

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                      • #12
                        guide blocks really help for this job. The seals stretch a bit during installation. do to the friction/pressure on the bearing cap/block tugging on the seal.

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                        • #13
                          Thank you guys,
                          1963 Series II A 88

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                          • #14
                            I've had good luck with the cork seals but like Ike says guide blocks are really helpful for a good installation. Otherwise plan on ruining about 4 sets of seals before getting it in right, and even then you're left frustrated and in doubt.
                            Mike S

                            "If there's one thing I've learned, it's that life is one crushing defeat after another until you just wish Flanders was dead."
                            -- Homer J. Simpson

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                            • #15
                              Thank you,

                              I've decided to go with what I know, I'm going to use Right Stuff and not fiddle with the seals at all.

                              Over the years I have been really successful building motors which actually didn't leak oil.
                              I hate oil leaks. Now with that said, I've never owned a Series truck before and have never built one of these motors.

                              If the truck doesn't leak oil, how will I know if it has oil in it?

                              Thx

                              Scott
                              1963 Series II A 88

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