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Brake Line Fittings 101/info guide?

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  • Brake Line Fittings 101/info guide?

    I'm on a slow grind to replace all of the clutch hydraulics on my NADA. I'm switching to copper and copper nickel lines and a stainless flex line. But the new ordered parts aren't exactly the same as the originals. For example, instead of a banjo at the clutch slave, it will now be a tapered threaded fitting and the connection at the master is different (why did LR use that weird reduction adapter piece at the master?).
    Now that I've bought all of the components, I've thought about having the supplies on hand for whatever the next similar project would be. Rolls of 3/16 or 1/4 Cupro tubing is readily available. As well as good and easy to use flaring tools. But the fittings?? I've found plenty of slow sources for them, but what to order? Most of the brake stuff has been 3/16. But some of the clutch stuff was 1/4. And it looks like there are metric (euro?) and SAE fittings which are both different than British stuff (maybe same threads but different (longer) unthreaded shoulder lengths where the fitting fits inside the component).
    Does anyone know of a good reference for diagrams of the different fittings? Right now I need to find at least one tapered to compression adapter for where the clutch master connects to the output line.

  • #2
    The FedHill link in this thread has lots of options. I had a tough time finding those shouldered fittings you mention. https://www.gunsandrovers.com/forum/...58-brake-stuff
    gene
    1960 109 w/ 200TDI
    rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/



    "We are prisoners of the Present, forever transitioning between our inaccessible Past and our unknowable Future." Neil DeGrasse-Tyson

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    • #3
      Biggest thing is using the correct fitting. My truck has a mix of fitting types as well. Here's a handy chart: zf6dsob-png.310720 (384?560) (toyotanation.com)
      (Also note that in the bottom pictures, those fittings can be used with either bubble or double flares, and that depends on the mating part.)

      Note that the M10 and 3/8 fitting threads are very close and can be mix-matched. But if you do this, they can strip out. I've also used 3/8 fittings where the thread relief was not enough and the flare was not being held tight enough against the internal cone on the brake wheel cylinders! But it actually worked like that for several months before I caught the (slow) leak!!

      Copper line is fine for the clutch system, but not rated for disc brake systems. Use Copper nickel for any brake lines. I've purchased line and fittings from here and been happy: BrakeConnect | Tools and Hardware for Brake Professionals

      NAPA carries the fittings as well. I have a box of each type. Just have them pull out their brake book and you can get the ones you need there too.
      They also have a good stock of adapters and you can likely match what you need if you take it up there.
      Last edited by 50 wulf; 07-10-2024, 02:00 AM.

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      • #4
        I believe the adaptor in the clutch m/c provides steel threads for the flare fitting instead of aluminum. Your truck should be all SAE fittings.

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        • #5
          So in getting my facts straight to make this post, I have arrived at an answer. The hard line was made wrong on one end, since it has an inverted flare and not a bubble flare like the pictures show everywhere. I can cut off the end end and re-flare it. But go ahead and see if anyone knows the answer to my question anyway.

          Thanks for all of the sources of info. I think I am down to just needing one adapter. The purchased line that goes from the clutch master to the flex hose (P/N 570091) doesn't match at the clutch master end. While both are 3/8-24 ends with a 3/16 line, the line has an inverted flare end (aka has an 'innie') and the master takes a bubble flare fitting (therefore the master also has an 'innie'). So I tried to find an adapter converting the 3/8-24 inverted flare to the 3/8-24 male bubble. And I DID! AGS BLF-30C In stock, $5, under 2 miles away. BUT! the female side isn't deep enough to start the shouldered (non-threaded portion). So what do I search for to find a 3/8-24 inverted shouldered (Girling?) female to 3/8-24 bubble male adapter?
          What are the shouldered ends known as (I only really see reference to diameter and threads), although some places also use terms like British or Girling.

          And here is the best, all in one, place I've seen for different pics of fittings and such. https://www.yourtireshopsupply.com/p...log%202-14.pdf


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          • #6
            You should not need adapters for this. The fittings are the same only the flare on the tube is different. You can screw a bubble flare line into a fitting requiring a double flare and the host component will form the bubble flare into a double flare.

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            • #7
              series guy But I don't have a bubble flare. My line came with an inverted flare end, but I think it was supposed to have a bubble flare one.

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              • #8
                I've looked for those Girling/British adapters before and never found them. Maybe they exist somewhere. Your best bet here is to cut off the flare, and reflare the end with the bubble flare you need.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by series guy View Post
                  You should not need adapters for this. The fittings are the same only the flare on the tube is different. You can screw a bubble flare line into a fitting requiring a double flare and the host component will form the bubble flare into a double flare.
                  I've never tried this. Sounds like it could work, but I'd be scared of an incomplete double flare.

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                  • #10
                    Cause I just went thru this, I know the answer; non-threaded lead. And it surprised me that the lead wouldn't fit into a threaded nut.
                    gene
                    1960 109 w/ 200TDI
                    rebuild blog; http://poppageno.blogspot.com/



                    "We are prisoners of the Present, forever transitioning between our inaccessible Past and our unknowable Future." Neil DeGrasse-Tyson

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                    • #11
                      Something to be mindful of are used brake fittings with the unthreaded leade. After years of use/reuse the unthreaded section will flare out and make the fitting very hard to remove. Often times it will compromise the threads on the host part to the point of being unsafe for reuse. If you harvest these old fittings for reuse they will likely be difficult to start into the threads of a new component and often times compromise the new threads.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by series guy View Post
                        Something to be mindful of are used brake fittings with the unthreaded leade. After years of use/reuse the unthreaded section will flare out and make the fitting very hard to remove. Often times it will compromise the threads on the host part to the point of being unsafe for reuse. If you harvest these old fittings for reuse they will likely be difficult to start into the threads of a new component and often times compromise the new threads.
                        This is an excellent tip and has happened to me as well.

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